Biden moves to shore up support in blue states

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Biden appears to be losing the election, so he makes an effort to maintain support in blue states.

As he struggles for momentum in an election that appears to be moving away from Democrats and could leave him with a Congress that would put his White House through two years of misery, Joe Biden’s midterm pitch is growing more stern and apocalyptic.

On Thursday, the President traveled to New York instead of one of the crucial Senate swing states to promote the industry. It is evident from the fact that he campaigned in a state he won by more than 20 points two years ago that his poor approval ratings make it difficult for him to assist his party in emerging from a crisis.

Biden simultaneously argued that the economy was in far better health than most Americans believed it to be and that Republicans would collapse what he described as a recovery and put Medicare and Social Security at risk if they were to take control of the government next month.

His strategy mirrored the exceedingly difficult electoral situation in which Democrats find themselves, as they risk losing control of the House of Representatives and see their chances of retaining the Senate dwindling.

Republicans are focusing on deep blue states eleven days before the election in an effort to create a wave that could result in a sizable House majority. Republicans might win enough seats in the Empire State alone to change the House, They just need a net gain of five seats to do so.

Additionally, contests that will determine the makeup of the Senate also seem to be tightening, such in Arizona, where Democratic Sen. Mark Kelly once held a commanding advantage. The Pennsylvania Senate candidate John Fetterman’s weak debate performance this week, who is still dealing with hearing and processing impairments following a stroke, alarmed Democrats as well. The commonwealth offers the party its best opportunity to gain a seat and might be crucial to its efforts to maintain control of the 50-50 Senate, where Vice President Kamala Harris casts the deciding vote. The chat between Biden and the governor of New York was overheard by Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer.

The President, who is preparing for a barrage of Republican investigations into his administration, his handling of the US withdrawal from Afghanistan, and the business dealings of his son, Hunter Biden, who is the subject of a Justice Department investigation, could suffer greatly from the loss of either chamber.

Following recent elections, there is enough polling uncertainty that it is far too early to accurately assess the state of the race. But after his party harbored hopes of bucking the trend this summer in the wake of the Supreme Court overturning Roe v. Wade, Biden’s speech on Thursday reflected Democrats’ burden in this election and suggested that the historical pattern of first-term presidents getting a midterm election drubbing may be reasserting itself.

In essence, Biden is being forced to convince Americans, who according to polls are pessimistic about the economy, that things are not as bad as they seem.

His speech illustrated the political difficulties of publicizing the economy’s clearly positive features when inflation is raging at close to 40-year highs, including the promising GDP growth estimates reported on Thursday and a historically low unemployment rate.

In contrast, Biden’s predictions of bitter political battles with Republicans over entitlements and government spending in a potential confrontation over raising the debt ceiling served as a preview of what may be tense years in Washington in the future if political control is split between the parties.

The President proclaimed that a GOP-controlled Congress would detonate an economic “ticking time bomb.”

During his speech in Syracuse, Biden warned that “Social Security is under attack.”

If we don’t accede to their demands to cut Social Security and Medicare, they’ll shut down the government and, for the first time in American history, refuse to pay our obligations, putting us in default.

The President asserted that while Democrats frequently claim Social Security is in jeopardy before of elections, the plans put forth by Republican Sens. Rick Scott of Florida and Ron Johnson of Wisconsin this time actually pose a real threat to the retirement programme.

The President proclaimed that a GOP-controlled Congress would detonate an economic “ticking time bomb.”

During his speech in Syracuse, Biden warned that “Social Security is under attack.”

If we don’t accede to their demands to cut Social Security and Medicare, they’ll shut down the government and, for the first time in American history, refuse to pay our obligations, putting us in default.

The President asserted that while Democrats frequently claim Social Security is in jeopardy before of elections, the plans put forth by Republican Sens. Rick Scott of Florida and Ron Johnson of Wisconsin this time actually pose a real threat to the retirement programme.

Republican messaging on the economy and crime says that it is not happening 11 days out based on all the facts that is currently available.

 

The latter has even made the New York governor’s race unexpectedly competitive—the state hasn’t elected a Republican statewide in two decades. In Syracuse, which is also the site of a heated House election, Biden was in attendance with Hochul on Thursday.

 

positive growth reports Biden’s disparity in the economy

The President began his day with some unexpectedly good news: initial estimates indicate that the economy recovered in the most recent quarter at an annualized rate of 2.6%.

The administration’s economic stimulus measures will take some time to take effect, Treasury Secretary Janet Yellen said in an interview with CNN’s Phil Mattingly on Thursday.

In the interview that aired on “Erin Burnett OutFront,” she did, however, acknowledge that “Inflation is really high – it’s unacceptably high and Americans experience that every day.”

The President is in the infamously challenging position of trying to take credit for the positive elements of the economy while sympathizing with the suffering that many Americans are going through. The White House encountered a similar issue while he served as vice president in the Obama administration.

Now that the cost of living is so high, Biden must walk a similarly precarious political fine line.

“Inflation is still causing problems for many. In a virtual fundraiser this week for Iowa Rep. Cindy Axne, who has a difficult reelection, Biden said, “I grew up in a community, in a place where when my dad would say, at the end of the month, if you – what you’re making didn’t pay all your expenditures, you were in serious trouble.”

Even if our country’s inflation rate is lower than that of the majority of developed nations, the President continued, “I know that’s no consolation to someone sitting at the kitchen table, trying to put food on the table.”

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